Friday, October 25, 2013

Some ways of stringing beads onto thread for tatting projects


Some tatting projects call for beads to be strung onto the thread before starting to tat. There are various ways of getting the beads on, here are three methods that I use. 
To download a free PDF file of this tutorial, CLICK HERE.



Crochet hook:
Put the beads onto the shaft of a small steel crochet hook, and “hook” them onto the thread.
A crochet hook up to size 12/1.00mm can accommodate size 8° seed beads.
A crochet hook size 14/0.75mm usually works for size 11° seed beads.
For beads with very small holes, try a tiny size 15/0.5mm or 16/0.4mm crochet hook.  (Note: beads with very small holes might not fit on size 10 crochet cotton. Size 20 crochet cotton usually can accommodate most beads.)
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Wide eye beading needle:

A wide eye beading needle has a flexible large eye that flattens as the beads pass over it. A plastic “floss threader” (a tool made for dental care) works in the same way. With any of these needles, insert the thread for your project through the wide eye, pick up the beads onto the shaft of the needle, and slide the beads onto the thread.


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Standard needle and sewing thread:
A hand sewing or standard beading needle, in combination with a small piece of sewing thread, will also work to get beads onto your project thread. The needle has to be thin enough for the beads to pass over it. Thread the needle with the sewing thread, catch the project thread by passing the sewing thread around it, and thread the sewing thread through the needle again. Pick up the beads onto the shaft of the needle; slide them down the sewing thread, and onto the project thread. When all of the beads needed are strung onto the project thread, remove the needle and sewing thread.



8 comments:

Madtatter80 said...

Very nice tip to leave it's nice you covered some!

Amalie said...

To make stringing easier, especially for beads with a tiny hole, I dip the last inch of thread into superglue, smooth the fibers down with a quick wipe of paper, and let it dry.

It dries quick, the thread becomes super hard(like a needle), and when all the beads are strung, snip off the end and make with the tatting :)

Marilee Rockley said...

That's a great tip, thanks!

esoraleak; Kaela said...

I was looking at your Etsy shop. Marilee, your patterns are incredible! I love your style and the unique classic look of your jewelry.

Marilee Rockley said...

Kaela, thank you for the very nice compliment. So nice of you to say!

wonderjunkie said...

I use the same technique as Amalie, and it works beautifully! I am a needle tatter, and keep the hardened end on while I tat. That way I can thread beads on the "needle" side of the thread as well as draw them up from the ball side to make a 4 bead picot.

Suzan Maddox said...

Where and when to put beads on thread so they are standing up on the chain? I am pushing into place between ds in chain, from shuttle. Strung beads are on shuttle.

Marilee Rockley said...

To have the beads coming from the picots on the chain, the beads need to be strung onto the 2nd thread (the ball thread or 2nd shuttle thread). Slide the bead up when making the picot. What you have been doing (bead on the core thread) is another way to add beads, it gives a different effect. Georgia Seitz has an excellent tutorial on many different ways to use beads in tatting: http://www.georgiaseitz.com/classes/beads.html